cite

The <cite> element is used when you need a bibliographic citation that refers to a book or article. It specifically identifies the title of the resource. Its keyref attribute allows the citation to be associated to other possible bibliographic processing (not supported yet).

Contains

( text data or ph or codeph or synph or filepath or msgph or userinput or systemoutput or b or u or i or tt or sup or sub or uicontrol or menucascade or term or q or boolean or state or keyword or option or parmname or apiname or cmdname or msgnum or varname or wintitle or tm) (any number)

Contained by

section, example, desc, p, note, lq, q, sli, li, itemgroup, dt, dd, pre, lines, ph, stentry, draft-comment, fn, linkinfo, entry, prereq, context, cmd, info, tutorialinfo, stepxmp, choice, choptionhd, chdeschd, choption, chdesc, stepresult, result, postreq, refsyn, proptypehd, propvaluehd, propdeschd, proptype, propvalue, propdesc, screen, b, u, i, tt, sup, sub, codeph, codeblock, pt, pd, synnote

Inheritance

topic/cite

Attributes

Name Description Data Type Default Value Required?
keyref Currently not implemented in DITA processors. Provides a key that a process can use to look up the location of the cited material, and potentially create a link to it. NMTOKEN #IMPLIED No
%univ-atts; (%select-atts;, %id-atts;, translate, xml:lang) A set of related attributes, described at %univ-atts; parameter entity PE not applicable Not applicable
%global-atts; (xtrf, xtrc) A set of related attributes, described at %global-atts; parameter entity PE not applicable Not applicable
class, outputclass Common attributes described in Other common DITA attributes

Example

<p>The online article <cite>Specialization in the Darwin Information Typing
Architecture</cite> provides a detailed explanation of how to define new
topic types.</p>